cruelty free brands

We found all the best cruelty-free brands for you

It can be easy to forget about the ethics of the brands we buy products from during our weekly shops, but it is really important that we all make an effort to be a socially conscious shopper. Even if that just means taking a few extra seconds to check if a product has a cruelty-free symbol on it. We have found the best cruelty-free brands for you, as well as what cruelty-free actually means and how to know if a product is or not.

What does cruelty-free mean?

rabbits
Credit: Modern Farmer

If a product is cruelty-free, that means the product and none of the ingredients used in the product have been tested in animals. This is different to a vegan product, which just means that the product does not include any ingredients that have come from an animal.

What symbols should I look for?

cruelty free logo
Credit: The Green Hub

There are three different symbols to look out for on your products, all of which means the product is cruelty-free. Each logo represents the company that has certified the product as cruelty-free and include PETA, Leaping Bunny and Choose Cruelty-Free. The logo you will see depends on whereabouts in the world you are and where your products have been made.

Fashion:

Ted Baker

Credit: Ted Baker

All Ted Baker cosmetics are cruelty-free, and the company states on their website that none of their products and none of the ingredients in any of their cosmetics have been tested on animals. They have also been awarded with the Beauty without Bunnie’s certification by PETA.

H&M

Credit: H&M group

Body care, cosmetics, and fragrance products are all sold by H&M, which do not use animal testing on any of their products. H&M also don’t export their products to countries where animal testing is required by law, such as mainland China.

 

Toiletries and Make up:

The Body Shop ( L’Oréal )

body shop
Credit: Youtube

Body Shop used to be owned by L’Oréal but was sold to Natura Cosmeticos in 2017. However, they remain a cruelty-free brand. None of The Body Shop’s products or ingredients used in products have been tested on animals.

Superdrug

Credit: Superdrug

All of Superdrug’s own brand cosmetics and personal care products are cruelty-free, and have been approved by the International Leaping Bunny programme, so you should see that logo on those products.

LUSH

Credit: MEDIUM

LUSH is a company that has always been very outspoken against animal cruelty, so it should come as no surprise that their products are cruelty-free.

On their website, the organisations says: “We believe that animal testing is not acceptable. We recognise that customer safety is of importance but that this can be assured without the use of animals.”

Urban Decay (L’Oréal)

Credit: Urban Decay

All of Urban Decay’s products are cruelty-free as they do not test their products on animals. They have also been certified as a cruelty-free brand by PETA.

ManCave Inc

Credit: ManCave

ManCave is another certified cruelty-free brand, and have been approved by the International Leaping Bunny programme.

Bulldog Skincare For Men

Credit: YOYBuy

Bulldog skincare for men is also a cruelty-free brand, and no wonder as who would want to test products on man’s best friend. None of their finished products or ingredients used in products are tested on animals. They also choose not to sell their products in countries where animal testing is required by law.

Supermarkets:

Morrisons

Credit: Cosmetics Business

Morrisons also believes that beauty should be cruelty-free, and are approved by the International Leaping Bunny programme, so you can use their own brand cosmetic and personal care products with peace of mind, knowing that they have not been tested on animals.

Sainsbury’s

Credit: Sainsbury’s

All of Sainsbury’s own brand cosmetics, personal care and household cleaning products are cruelty-free, and have been approved by the International Leaping Bunny programme.

The Co-operative

Credit: Co-Op

All of the Co-Ops own branded toiletry, and household products are cruelty free. The brand have also had the International leaping bunny label on their products since 2004 and were the first major UK grocer to gain this certification across all their toiletries, cosmetics, and household cleaning products.

Marks and Spencer

Credit: From Dusk til Dawn

M&S is also a cruelty-free brand, as they have confirmed that they don’t test any of their finished products or ingredients on animals. They also do not sell their products in countries where animal testing is required by law.

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